“I Wanted to Make Art that Told a Story”: Alison Saar on Her Eloquent Sculptures

Alison Saar moves freely and seamlessly from the deeply personal to more political work, dealing with the history of race in America.  She has made work that speaks of her experience of becoming a mother, creating narratives about the African deity Yemaja, a mother spirit and patron saint, especially of pregnant women. In her current solo show at LA Louver, Saar addresses the history of slavery in America.  The title of the exhibit, Topsy Turvy, is a reference to the character Topsy in Uncle Tom’s Cabin. In the novel, the inhuman treatment that rendered her callous and indifferent to life is transformed through love, leading her to be filled with hope and a desire for good.

Source: “I Wanted to Make Art that Told a Story”: Alison Saar on Her Eloquent Sculptures

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