George Washington Carver: An Uncommon Life

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The Most Revolutionary Act

George Washington Carver: An Uncommon Life

PBS (2020)

Film Review

This is an intriguing documentary about the highly controversial African American George Washington Carver. The latter has come under heavy criticism from anti-Jim Crow activists (starting with W.E.B Dubois 1868-1963) for his failure to challenge the institution of racism.

I should note that two of the corporate financial interests that sponsored the making of this film (DuPont and Alliance Energy) have appalling record when it comes to acknowledging any kind of racial or social justice. Thus I suspect the history they portray may be somewhat “sanitized.”

I  myself knew almost nothing about Carver’s life prior to watching this film. Born into slavery in 1864, Carver and his mother were illegally abducted when he was only a few months old and resold to an Arkansas plantation owner. The family’s former slave master Moses Carver traveled to Arkansas to retrieve the family.

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Bone Rooms: From Scientific Racism to Human Prehistory in Museums

  In 1864 a U.S. army doctor dug up the remains of a Dakota man who had been killed in Minnesota. Carefully recording his observations, he sent the skeleton to a museum in Washington, DC, that was collecting human remains for research. In the “bone rooms” of this museum and others like it, a scientific …

Land Loss has Plagued Black Americans Since Emancipation

A different kind of plague

The Most Revolutionary Act

Rep. Louie Gohmert Advocates Sharecropping As Welfare ...

By Julian Agyeman and Kofi Boone

The Conversation

Underlying the recent unrest sweeping U.S. cities over police brutality is a fundamental inequity in wealth, land and power that has circumscribed black lives since the end of slavery in the U.S.

The “40 acres and a mule” promised to formerly enslaved Africans never came to pass. There was no redistribution of land, no reparations for the wealth extracted from stolen land by stolen labor.

June 19 is celebrated by black Americans as Juneteenth, marking the date in 1865 that former slaves were informed of their freedom, albeit two years after the Emancipation Proclamation. Coming this year at a time of protest over the continued police killing of black people, it provides an opportunity to look back at how black Americans were deprived of land ownership and the economic power that it brings. An expanded concept of the…

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Red Nation Podcast: No shorts, no losses & the morning star of US imperialism

PODCAST Check out @The_Red_Nation podcast two-part interview w/ @TefPoe & @abufelix12 on the settler colonial and white supremacist history of St. Louis. It explains this picture of white power Karen and Ken: Pt. 1: https://t.co/iAWhKBKUR8 Pt. 2: https://t.co/aytYoj56o4 https://t.co/pGnGLNvKgn pic.twitter.com/R43duNkdxN — Nick Estes (@nick_w_estes) June 30, 2020 https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js St. Louis, MO once rose as the …

The Co-opting of Activism by the State — OffGuardian

A judge-led public enquiry in the UK revealed at least 144 undercover police operations had infiltrated and spied on more than 1,000 political groups in long term deployments since 1968.

The Most Revolutionary Act

by

By Dustin Broadbery

It is well documented that members of the police and intelligence communities have been infiltrating activist groups since the sixties. With covert spymasters rising in the ranks to hold influential leadership positions, guiding policy and strategy, and in some cases, radicalising those movements from within, in order to damage their reputation and weaken public support.

A judge-led public enquiry in the UK revealed at least 144 undercover police operations had infiltrated and spied on more than 1,000 political groups in long term deployments since 1968.

These days, rather than using coercion to suppress sedition, there is a body of evidence to suggest the state has devised more nefarious methods for countering subversion. Involving the co-opting of grassroots movements, in its bid to transform the unbridled ideals of activism into genuflections of corporate and political interest.

Indeed, the denaturing of our social movements has engendered a…

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The Racist History of Voter Registration | Time

These first registration systems were not just among the earliest forms of voter suppression—they became a blueprint for Jim Crow. After the Civil War, literacy tests and residency requirements were repurposed to target Black voters. To these, southern lawmakers added repressive new tools of their own. The most pernicious was created in the 1890s, when …

There is no such thing as RACE | Facing History

ORIGIN OF THE IDEA OF RACE by Audrey Smedley Anthropology Newsletter, November 1997 From its inception, separateness and inequality was what "race" was all about.  Contemporary scholars agree that "race" was a recent invention and that it was essentially a folk idea, not a product of scientific research and discovery.  This is not new to …

White Shields · LRB 9 June 2020

One cannot simply dismantle this paradox in a single act; it is something white people need to work through systematically. A first, indispensable step is to recognise our privilege. But privilege is not an attribute that one has and can simply give up. The operations of privilege are complex, and since it is an effect …

Historical Painting Is Altered to Show Most Declaration of Independence Signatories Were Enslavers

In a poignant illustration of this hypocrisy, Arlen Parsa, a Chicago-based documentary filmmaker, covered the faces of every enslaver in the painting with a red circle: a 34 out of the 47 men pictured, most of whom were signers of the Declaration. (The fact-checking website PolitiFact has corroborated Parsa’s count.) WOW: Historical Painting Is Altered …

“Check Your Privilege” Challenge On TikTok And It’s A Big Reality Check

Here are the "put a finger down" experiences she outlines in her video: – Put a finger down if you have been called a racial slur. – Put a finger down if you've been followed in a store unnecessarily. – Put a finger down if someone has crossed the street in order to avoid passing …

Trump’s Niece Mary Trump To Release Tell-All ‘Too Much And Never Enough’

Turns out that Trump’s niece, Mary Trump, is part of the resistance, or she just happens to hate her uncle just as much as the rest of America, but either way she’s set to release a tell-all book that is expected to blow the barn doors off the White (Supremacy) House. Source: Trump's Niece Mary …

‘Get your knee off our necks’: Minneapolis honours George Floyd

“George Floyd’s story has been the story of Black folks. Because ever since 401 years ago, the reason we could never be who we wanted and dreamed to be is you kept your knee on our neck,” he added. “It’s time for us to stand up in George’s name and say, ‘Get your knee off our necks!’”

Alexanders' Blog

Minneapolis, United States- Eight minutes and 46 seconds of silence. Eight minutes, 46 seconds of prayer. For eight minutes and 46 seconds, thousands in Minneapolis, Minnesota, stood silently with their heads bowed to remember George Floyd, the unarmed Black man killed by police here last week.

It was the same amount of time that a white police officer knelt on Floyd’s neck as he cried out: “I can’t breathe.”

It was an amount of time that has become a rallying cry across the United States against police brutality and violence against Black people.

“That’s a long time,” said Reverend Al Sharpton, who eulogised Floyd on Thursday in Minneapolis.

“There’s no excuse. They had enough time, they had enough time,” he told the gathering.

“George Floyd’s story has been the story of Black folks. Because ever since 401 years ago, the reason we could never be who we wanted and…

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The Sioux man ’empowering’ Standing Rock with solar power | USA | Al Jazeera

Cody Two Bears, who is behind North Dakota's first 300-kilowatt solar farm, is bringing power to Standing Rock. Standing Rock Reservation, North Dakota - More than four years ago, the roads and rolling plains north of the Cannon Ball settlement on Standing Rock Reservation were strewn with tear gas, private security squadrons and thousands of …

Alexander Mallory: Tribes have full legal authority to use checkpoints to safeguard health

The facts here present a different story. Unlike the threat of some careless drivers on a public highway, the potential spread of COVID-19 to a rural tribal community unquestionably involves a direct effect on the health or welfare of the tribe. Indeed, it’s no secret that COVID-19 cases and deaths continue to rise in South …

Remember this: 150 Artists and Activists Take Their Trump Protest to Ivanka’s Doorstep

This happened in 2016 which seems like 100 years ago. Over 150 artists, writers, curators, gallery workers, and other activists showed up outside Ivanka Trump's Manhattan apartment in a protest organized by Halt Action Group. Source: 150 Artists and Activists Take Their Trump Protest to Ivanka's Doorstep

What is The Opposite of Revisionism?

Here we are…

Embrace Serendipity

There is a term for rewriting history, we call it Revisionism. We often see it applied to denials of the Holocaust, or to those who pretend that U.S. treatment of blacks and Native Americans was other than the sordid reality that it was. There are a lot of places where it shows up, if we are paying attention.

I wonder about the way we judge the men and women who lived 50, 100, 150 years. We think nothing of applying contemporary standards to them, as if they knew back then what we know today. But obviously that is not the case; has never been the case; will never be the case. That’s really quite unfair. Isn’t that like judging a 5 year old child by the standards of a 70 year old adult?

Don’t misunderstand. I’m not making excuses for anyone’s bad behavior. Not for ANYONE. But we all…

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